Tags: heritage

Tags: heritage

Tags: heritage

Tags: heritage

Tags: heritage

""Have any special collections had experience with a commercial publisher of digital products that disbinds your rare books for ease of scanning them? A large special collection which contracted with a well-known vendor of digital library products has had a number of its rare sammelbände disbound during the scanning process. The vendor has also suggested to the library’s director that the vendor should be allowed to disbind the library’s 17th through 19th-century manuscripts to make them easier (and presumably cheaper) to scan. In this day of improved technology such as the Zeutschel and other book scanners, is it ever really necessary to break a book in order to capture page images? (These volumes sewn normally, not stab sewn or stapled). If such destruction is not necessary, how do you communicate this to library administrators who think they’re getting a terrific deal because the publisher is paying for the content?" (EXLIBRIS-L)"

Archivalia: Incredibly stupid

"According to Kidd’s research, Hearst purchased the manuscript in 1926 and sold it through Gimbel Brothers in November 1942. Since leaves of the Missal were offered by New York dealer and Ege-collaborator Philip Duschnes that same month, it seems likely, as has been posited, that it was Duschnes who bought the manuscript and wielded the knife. He would have then sold remnants of the fragmented manuscript to Ege, who went on to distribute leaves of the missal through his usual channels."

Manuscript Road Trip: Sweet Home Alabama (and Georgia too) | Manuscript Road Trip

"After a sobering tour and inspection of the interior of the Mackintosh along with Professor Tom Inns with two expert colleagues today we have a much clearer idea of what the situation is. Bad news first is that we have lost the iconic and unique Mackintosh library. This is an enormous blow and we are understandably devastated."

The Glasgow School of Art Media Centre: Statement from Muriel Gray on the state of the Mackintosh Building

Tags: heritage

Tags: heritage

"As for the concern about institutional control: I have little sympathy for it. While it’s possible that providing free online access to the books in these houses would reduce visitation levels, it seems highly unlikely: the books’ content is inaccessible to visitors now, so access to it can hardly be attracting visitors. And unless the Trust has plans to digitize the books itself and somehow generate revenue from the digital images, there is little or no opportunity cost to letting someone else create the images and potentially profit from their public availability. There may well be other barriers to the Trust engaging in a project like this. I hope they can be overcome. As of now, the public-domain books housed in these historic properties are a public treasure to which the public that owns them has effectively no access."

Public Access to Public Books: The Case of the National Trust | The Scholarly Kitchen

Tags: heritage

"ABA members should be aware that books bearing the stamp of the Stralsund Gymnasium Bibliothek, with release stamp, may not be quite what they seem. In 2012, several thousand volumes from the Stralsund city archives were sold to an antiques dealer, and subsequently dispersed in the trade. Some of the more notable books, such as a Kepler volume, appeared at auction. It appears that the sale of these books was not legal under the terms of the library’s charter but that title was legally transferred in subsequent sales. The library has been buying back some of the books sold. Anyone who has a book bearing the Stralsund library stamp should contact: Dr. Burkhard Kunkel at: burkunkel@web.de"

Stralsund Library Stamp

"More books from the Mendham Collection will be sold at Sotheby’s on 20 May as part of their Music & Continental Books & Manuscripts sale. These will include the first edition of Wyclif’s works (Worms, 1525), as well as a unique Venetian incunable. As Clive Field remarked in a listserv post this week, “This year is therefore likely to see the complete dismemberment by the Law Society of one of the country’s most important religious libraries formed in the nineteenth century, the cataloguing of which the British Library funded.”"

PhiloBiblos: Links & Reviews

Tags: heritage